In California divorces, pets will be treated more like children

Kabir Chibber, Quartz
 
Losing a beloved pet in a breakup might be worse than the breakup itself. One woman going through a divorce told her therapist she didn’t mind it when her husband left the family home but “wept uncontrollably” when she had to sell her horse. The courts don’t see it that way, though.

Brown Vetoes Compassionate Care

A flurry of bills approved during California’s 2018 legislative session met their fate over the weekend.
 
Zack Ruskin, SF Weekly
 
One of the most substantial victories was AB 1793, which will automatically expunge or re-sentence prior cannabis convictions, expanding on efforts already underway in San Francisco and Alameda counties.
 
In a statement, NORML Executive Director Erik Altieri praised AB 1793 as “an important and necessary move to ensure justice for individuals pr

California Law Will Give Pets More Status In Divorce Cases

Adriana Sandoval, IHeartDogs.com
 
 
California Governor Jerry Brown signed a bill Thursday that will give pets more status in divorce cases starting next year.
 
The law previously required judges to consider pets property, which had to be distributed equally between divorcing couples who couldn’t come to an agreement. This meant that multiple pets might be split between two homes, never to see each other again.

California judges to rule on who keeps the pet in divorce cases

Courts will ask who takes the animal for walks, who pays the vets bills and who does it go to when called by both owners
 
Colin Drury, Independent
 
Judges in California as they have been granted powers to decide who keeps the family pet in contentious divorce cases.
 
Courts across the Golden State are to rule on cats, dogs and other household animals in the same way they do in child custody disputes, under a law set for 2019.
 
Judges will

California's AB 2273 Changes Treatment of Pets in Divorce Proceedings

With AB 2274, California Becomes Third State to Treat Pets More Like Children During Divorce Proceedings
 
The new law goes into effect January 1, 2019, adding Section 2605 to California’s Family Code and requiring judges to consider a companion animal’s best interests in divorce disputes.
 
Keeley Nickelson, ForesterPurcell.com
 
With the legislative session wrapping up this weekend and his legacy on the line, Governor Jerry Brown has been busy.

Bill to Protect Legal Non-Citizens from going Hungry and Homeless is Vetoed

SACRAMENTO – Earlier this year, Assemblymember Bill Quirk (D-Hayward) partnered with Alameda County and Western Center on Law and Poverty to introduce a bill, AB 2111, that streamlines and aligns the CalFresh and CalWORKs programs in order to assist sponsored noncitizen individuals and families from the risk of hunger and homelessness. Governor Brown vetoed this bill earlier today.